LOS LUNAS — The community members of Jubilee at Los Lunas are part of the group that are most vulnerable to the adverse effects of the COVID-19 virus, but they’re not letting that fact stop them from fighting back.

A group of 10 local health professionals from the Jubilee retirement community prepared for and established a model COVID-19 Coronavirus Community Action Plan, which is led by John Trestrial, a forensic toxicologist, Zena Kinne, a disaster preparedness nurse, and Nick Blea, Jubilee’s developer.

“As I was watching this thing develop — it was the first case out of Washington state — I thought this is going to come our way sooner than later,” Trestrial said.

He put out a call to the community members with health care backgrounds and the group was formed.

“We assembled what we called the Community Health Team to watch over Jubilee,” he said.

They came up with a written plan that answers concerns that surround susceptibility, prevention procedures, a plan in the case the community is exposed, how to help their neighbors and emotional support.

“Our team consists of pharmacists, nurses, hospital administrators and social workers who have dealt with these kinds of emergencies. Our mission here is to maintain the health of the Jubilee residents,” Trestrial said.

If a resident went under voluntary self-quarantine, a support team would call their home every day asking how they were doing and if they needed anything like their medications picked up or groceries.

“We never want anyone to feel abandoned,” Trestrial said.

“A transport team will go down and pick it up for them. They’ll order what they need online and pay for it and we’ll pick it up and bring it to your front door.”

The 55 plus adult community has a community center at the heart of it called the Villa, where various activities such as tennis, billiards, swimming, aerobics and much more are held. Because of the major health risks, the Villa has been closed until they are given the OK to open it back up for residents.

“Our community members are really jumping into action to help each other,” said Jubilee sales manager Bailley Lujan. “I don’t think it’s all that different to what the community usually does for one another.”

Jubilee residents are still active but are not gathering together in large groups and following the health guidelines provided by the state.

Lujan said many potential clients are still interested in moving to the gated community, many of whom are from out of the state.

“My main concern, as the developer, is the safety of the community, not only the existing residents but all of the new construction that we’re doing and all the workers that come onsite,” Jubilee developer Nick Blea said.

“I want to make sure there’s a confidence that we’re doing the best that can possibly be done to ensure the safety of this community.”

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Anna Padilla, News-Bulletin Staff Writer