PNM’s green promise raises a red flag

Editor:

They say Republicans are the party of the rich. I am not rich, and most of us are not as wealthy as Gov. Lujan Grisham or Patricia K. Collawn, CEO of PNM, who collects a whopping $8,000,000 in salary.

PNM is swimming in money. Should the possible merger with Avangrid happen, it will give PNM’s top three executives nearly $30 million as a parting gift.

You would think with so much green, that PNM would be able to deliver on its green policies. But here is where the utility giant is short-circuiting its promise with New Mexicans.

New Mexico’s “Mini Green New Deal” passed by the Democrat-led Legislature is forcing us to have greener energy sources and encouraging us to buy electric cars. But what’s the plan? Is wearing a T-shirt that states “I am green” the answer?

Here’s the green deal, or rather the raw deal — the truth — PNM can’t provide solar service. I decided to play ball with the administration and go green.

I have 24 solar panels on my carport at home, but unfortunately I found out they cannot be connected to the grid. PNM informed me their “feeder” is full and cannot accept any additional solar power.

“Why not,” I asked, hoping I could play a role in making New Mexico more energy efficient.

They said they lack the capacity to accept the “extra energy.” That was according to the solar engineers at PNM. Additionally, I was told there are no more renewable energy credits (REC) to offset the carbon footprint of my home. So what am I to do with my 24-panel solar carport?

I am now stuck with just protecting my car under the carport from direct sunlight exposure, since PNM can’t use my energy, and I can’t use my solar energy without PNM. PNM has failed me and other New Mexicans with its inability and incompetence when it comes to delivering green services. It’s not surprising.

I can vividly remember rate hikes approved by the PRC when PNM cried out that their costs were increasing, salaries were needed, and it needed cash to help close San Juan Generating Station. What I don’t remember is PNM asking for rate increases to improve aging infrastructure where I live in Valencia County and where my solar energy can’t be used now.

PNM has promised power reductions, brownouts and scheduled blackouts. Ten years ago, it was among the cleanest and most reliable power producers in the country. Now I lose power at my house on a regular basis.

All I ask is for my home to have consistent power. Is that too much in the 21st century? PNM is unreliable, and it’s shocking and insulting to know that as this rich utility is rolling in money, people such as myself face scattered power outages.

To top it off, as gasoline approaches $5 a gallon, how am I to save for that electric car that I am supposed to purchase? How will I charge it with solar power since I can’t use my solar source?

I hope the governor and PNM can tell this poor Republican what to do next.

Michael Candelaria

Los Lunas

 

It’s not acceptable

Editor:

As I was driving home a few weeks ago, I noticed a large plume of smoke coming from the bosque.

It wasn’t a new sight to see, but rather a familiar, disturbing one I’ve seen before — one we’ve all seen before.

I know they haven’t said what the cause of the fire was, but I’m betting it was human caused. There was no lightening in the area, and there isn’t any powerlines that go through the bosque.

Whether it was accidental or intentional, someone needs be held accountable. They need to pay for the damages they caused.

Even if they are never caught, I hope they realize the damage they did and the lives they disrupted. It’s not acceptable.

Charles Garcia

Los Lunas

 

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The Valencia County News-Bulletin is a locally owned and operated community newspaper, dedicated to serving Valencia County since 1910 through the highest journalistic and professional business standards. The VCNB is published weekly on Thursdays, including holidays both in print and online.