“Unwrapped” on the Food Channel, Mondays, 7 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 10 p.m., 10:30 p.m. and Sundays, 12:30 p.m. All times MT.

Did you ever wonder where the tiny marshmallows in your breakfast cereal came from?

Or when Kool-Aid was created?

Or how your favorite candy is made?

“Unwrapped” on the Food Channel uncovers behind-the-scenes details on classic American food, from peanut butter and chocolate syrup to French fries and bubblegum.

Host Marc Summers leads the weekly, half-hour excursion to the factories to reveal the secrets behind lunch box treats, soda pop, movie candy and more.

Each show explores a group of foods, from candy, carnival food and drive-ins to cocktail parties and picnics. Besides learning how some of the items are made, there are features on the history of one of the companies making the food and a trip to a museum or interesting business associated with that week’s topic.

One recent show explored the world of soda pop. Viewers made a trip to a very special specialty store in Los Angeles, Galcos Old World Grocery, where every type of soda pop imaginable is available including honeydew cantaloupe soda and black lemonade, which leaves the tongue black.

For those who like history trivia, Kool-Aid drink was the topic. It was invented by Edwin Perkins in Hastings, Neb. In 1927, he dehydrated his invention of Fruit Smack to get Kool-Aid. Originally, there were six flavors: strawberry, cherry, lemon-lime, grape, orange and raspberry.

The show concluded with a look back at TANG. It was already on sale, beginning in 1957, when the Gemini 4 astronauts requested it for their flight in 1965. Now there are 30 different flavors sold all over the world.

One can not do a show on soda pop without making a visit to a museum of beverage containers or was that segment on the show about beer?

Anyway, the museum has rolls upon rolls, aisle after aisle of beer and soda cans. The museum is located in Millersville, Tenn.

Another interesting show was “Spuds Unwrapped.” This episode dealt with everything imaginable associated with potatoes. After seeing how instant potato flakes, Pik-Nik Potato Sticks and Andy Capp Hot Fries are made, the history of potato vodka was explored.

Viewers were introduced to candymaker Sandee Tuck, who creates spud fudge and shapes it like baked potatoes, with all the toppings of butter and sour cream, wrapping it in aluminum foil.

Spud fudge was created using potatoes to replace one-third of the sugar. The baked potato was the result of Tuck trying to make a chocolate-covered Easter egg, but it ended up looking more like a potato than an egg.

Another imaginative use of potatoes has been developed and marketed as Bonsai Potato kits. Bonsai Potatomiester Jeff Fitzsimmons and marketing guru Mike Dillion have built a business of creating the kits, which contain a base and gravel to support the potato and its growth.

Their campaign slogan is Zen without the wait. The kits contain everything needed to learn the shortcuts to patience and achieve inner peace fast.

The Seattle, Wash., entrepreneurs are now hosting bonsai potato competitions. They have received entries from across the United States, Japan, Australia, Germany and even Kuwait.

A show on spuds would not be complete without a visit with Mr. Potato Head, or at least a collector, such as Jeff Potocsnak. The spud everyone loves to play with turned 50 this year, so, of course, “Unwrapped” had to pay a visit to Potocsnak to see what type of collectibles he has accumulated.

Each episode of “Unwrapped” will take you on another interesting excursion into another group of foods, such as retro candy, ice cream toppings, frozen novelties, lunch box treats and, of course, cookies.

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Jane Moorman