There are codes in real life

 

for how we dress and behave

Editor:

I am writing in response to the letter sent in by Mr. and Mrs. Guy R. Cornejo. As a parent, I want to write in defense of the Los Lunas High School dress code.

First of all, I agree with the dress code and feel that it gives students plenty of opportunities to show their individuality without breaking the dress code.

The students are in school to learn. They have time after school and on weekends to be fashion statements.

The high school dress code is less restrictive than many other schools’. The students’ appearance shouldn’t be a distraction to those around them who are there to learn or there to teach.

There are reasons for the restrictions, and the students are given warnings before they are disciplined.

In the future, students will be in the work force, and most jobs will either have a dress code or possibly even a uniform.

As responsible American citizens, we follow all sorts of rules and regulations, but we also receive many privileges as well.

I am thankful that the high school is there to help teach and guide our students as they finish their last years of school and enter adulthood.

Jude Aragon

Los Lunas

That’s not what assistants do

Editor,

I am responding to the article in Wednesday’s paper, Aug. 14, which told of two former Furr’s employees now employed as Certified Medical Assistants (CMA) in a local physician’s office. Congratulations to these two women for their perseverance and accomplishments; any study in a medical-related field is not easy.

However, one sentence in that article needs clarification. I do hope that the description of the tasks and responsibilities of a CMA did not originate from the interview or physician office, but rather in the composition of the entire article. I will be the first to admit that the duties and responsibilities of the varied unlicensed assistive personnel found in health care facilities today are often difficult to distinguish and often vary with each facility, its policies and level of training. But stating that a CMA “… performs any duty that a physician’s assistant might, except writing prescriptions” is totally wrong.

A physician’s assistant (PA) obtains a minimum of a bachelor’s degree, graduating from an accredited program, passing a national certification examination before then becoming licensed by the state. They are often included in the same classes as medical students and are licensed to practice medicine with physician supervision. They exercise a degree of autonomy in medical decision-making and diagnose and treat illness, order and interpret laboratory tests and may assist a surgeon in surgery. A CMA obtains a certificate of completion from a course of study with duties that include assistance with office management, assisting with client examinations, providing patient education, carrying out laboratory procedures and administering medications. This information was obtained from the websites of UNM and Pima Medical Institute.

I do not know (the doctor whose office was featured) and clearly am not making any statements that are meant to single out her office or staff. However, as a registered nurse, I am aware that, generally, health care facilities from offices to urgent cares to hospitals are hiring and/or training many levels of unlicensed assistive personnel (UAP’s) for cost containment purposes. The duties of UAP’s may often become fuzzy and individualized to the facility. I have seen what I call “creative labeling” of individuals (such as patient care assistant) working in these facilities, so that it is difficult for the health-care consumer to know exactly the experience, education, and level of expertise of these individuals. It is important for the consumer to ask questions of all persons they encounter while obtaining health care.

Regina L. Janke

Los Lunas

Many helped with parade

Editor:

The Greater Belen Chamber of Commerce would like to thank all those who participated in the Valencia County Fair parade. There were 70 units, including 18 riding groups.

Gene Vallejos, leader of the Valencia County Sheriff’s Posse, worked very hard in getting all the horse groups to participate, including a posse from El Paso, Texas. The Valencia County Sheriff’s Posse judges the horse groups and presents the trophies at a luncheon immediately following the parade.

Thanks to the businesses and non-profit groups who take time to create floats and advertise their support for our community. The children of all ages enjoyed watching and eating the candy that is distributed during the parade.

Congratulations to all the winners, and thanks to the Los Lunas and Belen High School bands for displaying their pride on parade day!

Barbara Torres

Parade chairman 2002

Belen

Re-Store your property

Editor:

Now that the dust has settled, I would like to take the opportunity to thank the volunteers (and customers) who helped the Habitat RE-Store move to our bigger location in Los Lunas, one block north of the Valencia Y, formerly Granny’s Attic. With the assistance of some anonymous helpers, we were up and running in two days!

What is RE-Store? A building-materials recycling center where tax-deductible donations of decent condition (useable) materials are sold to the public at 50 to 75 percent off retail price, thus providing funding to build more Habitat homes. Some materials are used at the job site to help keep the cost of the mortgages down (homeowners pay a small down payment and zero percent interest mortgage). The environmental aspect of this is also substantial less landfill waste (over 30 percent of landfill waste, nationally, is from construction). Local contractors and building-related businesses do not have to pay a dumping fee, and it’s for a good cause. Heck, we can even go to your place to pick it up. If a customer would like some free hands-on training on a project, we send them to the job site (besides, we can always use an extra volunteer!) Inside RE-Store we have an information area that includes related articles, how-to pamphlets and a list of local recyclers of various items if RE-Store can’t take it. Deconstruction, rather than demolition, is in the future for us.

There are about 400 of these RE-Stores across the country now; Valencia County, N.M., is the third one in our state. HFH’s goal is to help eliminate substandard and/or poverty housing. Everyone deserves a simple, decent place to live.

I have every intention of impacting Valencia County: Reuse + Recycle = Re-Store!

Jean Trent

Re-Store manager

Habitat homeowner

Los Lunas

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The Valencia County News-Bulletin is a locally owned and operated community newspaper, dedicated to serving Valencia County since 1910 through the highest journalistic and professional business standards. The VCNB is published weekly on Thursdays, including holidays both in print and online.